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John Speed: The Countie and Citie of Lyncolne Described with the Armes of Them that have Bene Earles Thereoe Since the Conquest

Map: LINCS299
 
Cartographer: John Speed
Title: The Countie and Citie of Lyncolne Described with the Armes of Them that have Bene Earles Thereoe Since the Conquest
Date: 1676
Published: London
Width: 20 inches / 51 cm
Height: 15 inches / 39 cm
Map ref: LINCS299
Description:
County Map. Inset plan of Lincoln. Decorative coats of arms.

Due to its long shore line, this map bears a particularly fine sea monster on the upper centre as well as a ship vignette on the sea near The Wash, a notorious area of marshes with a history for smuggling. The body of water on the East, now known as the North Sea, is called “The German Sea” on this map.

Geographically, the map adeptly shows the area known as the Fens, again an area of wetlands not suitable for dense habitation. However, the western and northern part of the county is shown as thoroughly settled. As usual, the geography is sourced from Christopher Saxton although as was often the case, there was an amount of revision and correction.

The large panel on the right titles the map and with an impressive coat royal coat of arms above it. This is balanced by a panel on the left listing the armorial shields and names of various important families that at some point held the title of Earls of Lincoln; just to the east of this panel are two vignettes of armies facing each other with an explanatory panel underneath stating this this refers to the Battle of Lincoln which took place in 1141 between the forces of King Stephen and the Empress Matilda. The other relates to the Second Battle of Lincoln in 1217 during the First Baron’s War and bears the distinction of being one of the few battles between France and England conducted on English soil.

The city plan of Lincoln is peculiar in that it is orientated East to West, with North being the left of the map. It is situated in that manner to show the city’s position in relation to the River Witham and the Fossdyke, possibly the oldest canal in England, originally built by the Romans in 120AD and connecting the city to the river Trent.

English text on verson. Image available on request.

[LINCS299]